Archive for the ‘Ethics’ Category

We do not travel alone

April 23, 2017

 Now the Lord said to Abram, ‘Go from your country and your kindred and your father’s house to the land that I will show you. I will make of you a great nation, and I will bless you, and make your name great, so that you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, and the one who curses you I will curse; and in you all the families of the earth shall be blessed.’

So Abram went, as the Lord had told him; and Lot went with him. Abram was seventy-five years old when he departed from Haran. Abram took his wife Sarai and his brother’s son Lot, and all the possessions that they had gathered, and the persons whom they had acquired in Haran; and they set forth to go to the land of Canaan.

Genesis 12:1-5a  NRSV

I have an unfortunate tendency to think the call of Abraham only involved Abraham. Periodically the text reminds me that Sarah traveled with him. Less frequently the text reminds me that Lot  and many others also went with Abraham.  But mostly I focus on Abraham.

For modern Americans to focus solely on Abraham is easy to do. Our typical way of thinking and understanding the world concentrates and celebrates the individual. We love stories about the lone person who perseveres, triumphs, saves, or overcomes. We admire and revere the “One”. Many of us secretly want to be the “One”. Or perhaps, we are waiting for the “One” to save us, protect us, love us.

But if we read Abraham’s story carefully, we discover that Abraham doesn’t travel alone. His call affects others. And others participate in his call. And of course others benefit from his calling.

In the ancient world successes and failures, joys and sorrows were communal events. How an individual’s actions affect their family and community were important considerations. The stories in the Bible remind us that our lives are not our own. Our lives and actions affect the lives of people we know and people we don’t know.

From Cain’s question, “Am I my brother’s keeper”, to Moses’ demand  “let my people go”, to the prophets’ insistence that we care for the widow and orphan and stranger, to Jesus’s teaching about caring for the “least of these”- over and over again we are told we must be concerned about the larger community.

That means that my faith cannot be simply or only about my relationship with God. My relationship with God compels me to be concerned about others, in my home, in my city, in my country and around the world.

The way our modern world functions means that my concern is often called “political”. I don’t apologize for that.  It has to be. Reading the Bible seriously means I must take the well being of others seriously and consider their needs before I consider my own. When I vote, I think about which candidate will be best for the poor and excluded, for the food insecure, the sick, the homeless, the children, the aged.  When a millage comes up, I vote for what I think best benefits the entire community, not just me, and not just what keeps my taxes low.  When I march for a just immigration policy, it is not because my immigration status is a risk or is even questioned by anyone. I march because the Gospel compels me to work for a society that care about and for immigrants and refugees.

We are, as children of Abraham, called to be a blessing for others- for all the families of the earth. To be sure, this makes my life more difficult. There are a lot of people I need to think about, people I don’t know, people I will likely never know. As I try to learn and understand all these different people, who live in different places and in different circumstances, I learn wonderful things and terrible things. My heart sings and breaks. So much joy and yet so much suffering. It can be overwhelming. It is overwhelming.

Fortunately, God has created a world where I don’t have to do it all and you don’t either. We help each other. We help people we know and they help us. We help people we don’t know and they help us.  And the Spirit is in the middle of all of it- opening our eyes to see, our ear to hear, our heart to love. Nudging us to a bigger, deeper, richer life.

We do not travel alone, Thanks be to God.

Voting

October 2, 2016

In case you hadn’t noticed, this is an election year. That means we ought to spend some time thinking about voting; what it means and how we make decisions about candidates and issues.

There are a lot of things we could talk about, what do do when neither candidate is a good fit with what you believe, (fyi, get used to that, no candidate is ever a perfect fit), where to find accurate information about positions, does voting even matter.

But that’s not what this post is about. I want to consider who we vote for. I don’t mean which candidate we vote for. I mean who in our nation we vote for. Who is our primary concern as voters?

For years we have been encouraged to vote for our values. We have been asked “Are you better off now than you were four years ago?” Candidates assure us they are “fighting for you”. Most of us view voting as an action mostly concerned with our personal well being. Will candidate X be good for me?

As a Christian I think the question should be “Will candidate X be good for others?” By others I mean the marginalized of society. How will the poor, the ill, the disabled, the unemployed, the immigrant, the prisoner fare with this candidate.

My vote should not be about me. My vote should be for others. As a Christian, “what’s in it for me?” is not a question I ought to be asking.

I think about food insecure college students I know. I think about the LGBTQA+ community. I think about young black men. I think about the mentally and physically ill.

Do I know what is best for all these groups? Of course not. But I do know some things that are good for them. Safety, decent housing, adequate food, equal opportunity. So I ask myself, which candidate will work for these things?

One of the grand themes of the Bible is God’s concern for the poor, the widowed and the orphaned. Those, in ancient times, were the oppressed and suffering groups. From Cain’s rhetorical question, “Am I my brother’s keeper?”,  to when Abram was blessed to be a blessing, to  Torah,  to the prophets, to Jesus, to Paul and John and the faithful since then, we are to be  our brother’s keeper, a blessing, concerned for the poor, suffering, and marginalized.

One of the ways we do this as people living in the United States is by how we vote. Not my values, not my self interest. God’s values and God’s interest.

Before you step into the voting booth this November, from the top of the ticket to the bottom, think about what you vote means. Who’s interests, who’s well being, who’s future are you voting for?


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